Hello Day one, I’ve missed you.

I’m done messing with my diet (she says for the 17th day in a row). No, but seriously, I really need to stop using these antibiotics as a crutch and start clean-eating again. I am a month into my 10 week course of Clindamycin and Rifampicin and although taking antibiotics goes against everything I believe in, I have to say the results are amazing. I am barely leaking at all, and the persistent swelling has decreased so much so, that I can throw myself down into a seat and there is no pain. Nada. Zilch. Nothing. HEAVEN!!!

Excellent, you say, no need to write anymore blog! Actually, no. These tablets are like a holiday for me. A little respite from real life. They are toxic and have horrible side effects. They can cause liver disease. They make my tongue furry (which swilling my mouth out with apple cider vinegar has cured, by the way). They have brought back my peeling, dry, itchy skin on my feet. They make me need to poop – and it’s not a pretty picture. I have to eat loads of sauerkraut (which actually isn’t too bad). They make me tired, a little out of sorts.

Most of all, I feel the opposite of how I did when I started the autoimmune diet. I feel like I am poisoning my body instead of healing it (did I mention I was a drama queen?). I was trying to heal my leaky gut with all that lovely, nourishing, home-cooked good food and now I am attacking my insides with chemicals.

Such a dichotomy.

Whilst I’m not looking a gift-horse in the mouth (that’s a really weird idiom!), I am only on these tablets short-term. I am still anticipating that after my 10 weeks is up, I am only going to get some major remission going on by sticking to my autoimmune protocol diet. In the meantime, I want to take advantage of the healing that has happened. I want to keep those sinus tracts shrunk, or healed or whatever has happened to them. I want to wear my bikini again and agin. I want to wear mini-skirts all summer, without Micropore peeping out of the bottom. I want to enjoy the freedom of spending under 2 minutes in the bathroom, because I have no dressings to change. I want to have a go on a Space Hopper. I want to sit comfortably with my baby on my knees, without wincing when she wiggles. I want the whole, entire and wonderful healed-upness of my Hidradenitis Suppurativa to stay just the way it is.

Today I got busy. I went to an amazing farmer’s market of organic goods  Lidl and bought as much of the fresh produce as I could fit in the bags I was carrying (it’s in the ghetto and they don’t have baskets). Their organic range is CHEEEEAP! They also stock the cured ham that I eat. It lists only ham and salt as the two ingredients and it’s cheaper by at least 2 euro here than in any other local supermarket. The only other packaged item I bought from there was Perrier. I dodged the drug dealers on the way out and Mr B did the rest of the food shopping at Auchan – the actual, biggest supermarket I have ever seen. So big, I walked for about 5 minutes before I even reached the food section. So big, I think it may be bigger, even, than Sam’s Club in Slidell, Louisiana! Maybe not as big as a supermarket in Texas, though. I digress.

I made a meal plan for this week to keep me on track. We kicked off tonight with cod, marinated in a lime, garlic, coconut oil sauce with fresh parsley and basil, Himalayan pink salt and organic cracked black pepper. This was served with sautéed green beans, oyster mushrooms, onion and garlic and all cooked by the lovely Mr B!

De-li-cious! Made even more tasty, because I didn’t have to lift a finger to cook it!

For the rest of the week, main meals are as follows (not in any particular order):

  1. Easiest roast chicken ever –  Instead of leeks, which we don’t have, we ‘ll be subbing courgettes in to this dish and serving it with salad. Who says roasties can’t be served up with a salad??
  2. Chicken and vegetable curry – using leftover chicken, homemade coconut milk, homemade curry paste (excluding paprika and chilli), ginger, garlic, onion, carrots and homemade chicken stock (I use this recipe, with frozen leftover peels and chicken bones). Served with cauliflower rice, fried with peas.
  3. Healthy Gluten-free Life’s Dutch Oven Pork – as featured on Nomnompaleo’s page. Love our Le Creuset Dutch Oven cocotte, which cooks food so evenly and keeps it moist. We’ll have that with sautéed broccoli, onion and garlic all fried in silky smooth organic coconut oil of course! Perhaps a side of salad, too.
  4. Large wild gamba, marinated in lime, garlic and ginger, seared on the griddle and served with my scrummy roasted sweet potatoes. And salad. And probably sauerkraut for me.
  5. Asian chicken thighs – again Michelle from Nomnompaleo’s recipe. What? Again? Yup. Each time I Googled the ingredients, hers was way up there and looked delicious, with only a few ingredients that I needed to remove to adapt for the autoimmune protocol. Served with salad.
  6. Sweet potato and prawn soup, which we’ve adapted from an Everyday Paleo recipe. We’ll have some leftover coconut milk and prawns (there are two kilos in the freezer and we’ll have to defrost the lot , so we’ll cook ’em all and throw some back in the freezer for this dish.

Et voila! That’s me all sorted for the week. I hope to all that is Holy and Mighty that there are no more sh*t storms this week and I manage to keep on track (and off the incredible Bordeaux wine).

Day one is done…..

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Dressing up for Hidradenitis Suppurativa

For those who have Hidradenitis Suppurativa (HS) or Acne Inversa, as it is also known, changing dressings is a daily or even hourly ritual. When HS is diagnosed, the patient’s disease is often given a stage of development, based on the Hurley scale of pain.

If you have early stages, you may have a limited knowledge of which dressings are available to you and may find this post useful – a novices guide to what’s available. However, those who have had surgery, incision and drainage and other more intensive procedures to remove glands and entire affected areas will probably have a far superior knowledge of this topic than I. Voila!

Getting dressed-up took on a whole new meaning....

Getting dressed-up took on a whole new meaning….

Micropore and gauze pads

I started trying to find different dressings when regular plasters were no longer big enough. I had the idea of using Micropore and gauze to cover the wounds and started off by buying 7.5 x 7.5 cm squares and regular Micropore. I would clean the affected area (in my case my groin, bikini line, entire genital and perianal area) with tea tree oil and warm water. Occasionally, I would apply organic Calendula oil or organic coconut oil to the spots before covering them with the dressings. The combination of healing qualities and soothing silkiness of the oil gave some relief to those tender areas.

I was amazed at the difference in quality of life such a small change had made. By covering the HS with the gauze, I could walk longer distances without getting sore. I still had to use sanitary towels, but felt the whole mess was a lot more manageable. After initially purchasing them myself, my doctor gave me a prescription for the dressings, including a larger 10 x 10 gauze pad and multiple boxes of Micropore. The larger gauze was much more effective, as I was beginning to need more coverage. Despite being happier, I was determined to find more ways to cover the suppurating wounds.

Mepilex Transfer 

My GP offered me a new dressing  – Mepilex Transfer, a silicone pad that adheres to the skin, but only really gently. As well as absorbing the exudate away from the skin and through to the other side, it provides a spongy and cushion-like layer against your delicate skin.

Mepilex transfer....the cushiony option

Mepilex Transfer….the cushiony option

Patch of pure perfection..

Patch of pure perfection..

My prescriptions in France are mostly reimbursable at 100%, but I still tried to be economical with the Mepilex knowing it was pretty pricey (around 26 euro/22 pounds/34 dollars for a pack of 16). I cut it up to cover my awkward and hard to reach HS sites and then strapped the whole area up with gauze and Micropore.

It was fantastic! I was so amazed at the technology of the whole thing. Where the gauze had worked by reducing the chaffing, this almost stopped it altogether. The exudate was concentrated in each area and looking at the Mepilex afterwards helped identify how many areas were weeping, or had healed. With Mepilex underneath the gauze, the dressing stayed in place over the wound and I did not get the same eye-watering shooting pain that I normally would just from taking a seat. It was no miracle cure, but boy, it was way better than just a pad in your underwear!

So I stopped there, right? No. I was still faced with the issue of having to change the pads every time I used the bathroom and was still looking for a waterproof option. I am not blessed with the strongest of bladders and just the thought of not being able to go pee makes me need to go again! Also the thought of using public toilets, whilst balancing over a seat, holding dressings away from your skin and then reapplying them or new ones, all with a 2-year-old clinging to my legs wasn’t inspiring me to leave the house!
I Googled away until I found this wound care sheet and other wound care information (the latter is for medical staff). It gave me a good place to start, especially as I was not seeing a dermatologist. Even if I was, it would have been good to have this info to take with me and demand stuff! I sent off some emails to the dressings companies, but they usually deal with dermatologists directly, so I set about pestering my lovely doctor and homeopath for some more prescriptions.
Duoderm – extra thin and bordered (Granuflex)
Bordering on comfort...

Bordering on comfort…

Sneaky peek at the hydrocolloid...

Sneaky peek at the hydrocolloid…

A-peel-able glimpse at the cushion finish.

A-peel-able glimpse at the cushion finish.

I mentioned on a previous post that I had intended to get Duoderm extra thin, thinking it would be a good waterproofing option. I wanted something I could leave on all day, without having to worry about changing it whilst I was out with the little one. Instead I ended up with Duoderm border, as featured above! It was a bit of a disaster, as I applied it with no knowledge of how it would work. It stuck firmly to my skin and the absorbent cushion layer was not what I was looking for on the whole waterproofing front. I had to take it off prematurely and it was all very painful!!

 I eventually got my Duoderm ET and after a rough start with the hydrocolloid dressings I decided that I needed to have a plan.
Extra thin and extra sticky

Extra thin and extra sticky

Wash the wounds and clean them before bed. Apply cut out Duoderm extra thin. Hold and mould against skin until it is firmly adhered. Leave in place for 24 hours and peel off after a soak in the bath or in the shower.

It worked, but alas, it rubbed/stuck together when applied on both sides of my groin/backside/top thigh area. This meant long walks with it were out, but it was perfect for long car journeys where using the rest room meant a quick in and out, with no awkwardness (other than hovering over a toilet seat – or the traditional hole in the ground!). The hydrocolloid absorbed the exudate and there was no chaffing from my clothes. If my HS had been elsewhere, I think both the Duoderm products would have been perfect for everyday cover.

Still undeterred, I spoke to the Pharmacist in my best French (probably more like primary school French, but I tried) and she showed me Hypafix. This was what I had been looking for all along – a thin layer of adhesive that I would be able to place over the Mepilex. It was 11 euro, and only 2 euro reimbursable, but heck, with all the free dressings I had had up until now, I was willing to pay out for this!

Deceptively papery...

I stick it where the sun don’t shine…

Hypafix

This stuff is a thin sheet of film. Trust me – under all that paper there really is just a layer of cling-film type stuff, that adheres beautifully to the skin. You cut it to size. Peel one side up to the red line, to expose the film. Stick it over your Mepilex patch, making sure you’ve got a good couple of centimetres around the dressing (if you can manage it – I couldn’t always due to the main offenders being on my bikini line and there ain’t much flat skin around there!) Peel the paper back and voila! A fully waterproof cover for your dressings. Now, I still had a few issues with keeping it stick to the skin, but mainly because my HS is all down below and pretty awkward to keep covered. However, it worked and I felt vindicated in my solo search for the waterproofing option!

Mepitel

The Pharmacist also recommended Mepitel, which my obliging doctor was happy to prescribe. it is a sticky meshing dressing and is to be used under another dressing. Again, I think this would be perfect for HS in other areas other than the groin, where the dressings do not need to be changed every bathroom break. Like the other dressings, it can be left in place for a long time and seriously reduces chaffing and promotes healing.

A sticky mesh...

A sticky mesh…

I hear that Medihoney is a really good dressing, too, but along with many others, I have yet to try it. It’s a wonderful world of technology out there and if you have the means, or a lovely doctor/dermatologist, you can get your hands on some super dressings to make the whole sticky mess a lot more comfortable.  Allez! Go try them!

I am currently dressing free, due to the antibiotics I am on. It is a relief, but only a temporary fix, so I may have to start strapping up my HS once the course is finished. Or not, if I manage to stick to the AI diet…wish me luck!

Serocytol immunosuppressant therapy and Hidradenitis Suppurativa.

I’ve been back to see my Homeopath. I’ve been prescribed a second batch of Serocytols, a Swiss homeopathic immunosuppressant treatment. It is a natural remedy made using blood from immunised horses, who are apparently very well cared for on the Serolab farm. Serum therapy, as it is known, has been around for over a century and was initially used to treat diphtheria and tetanus patients. The development of Serocytol came from this in the 1930’s.

It has no side effects, but I have yet to see any improvement from taking it thus far. I have had a three-month treatment and am about to embark on another three months. It costs me just under 120 euro (about 156 dollars/102 pound sterling) for the three months and I take it orally in a tincture. If you haven’t already read about why I’m taking Serocytol, here’s a little recap.

A good friend of ours, a lovely French man lived in the UK and married an English woman. She had Rheumatoid arthritis. She was young and had tried different treatments. He persuaded her to go and see his family homeopath back in France (in France it is common to have a homeopath treat you as regularly as a General Practitioner). She was prescribed Serocytol and took it for three months with no results. She was further persuaded to take it for another three months and noticed improvements. About 6 months later, she took another 3-month course and she is cured.

Horsing around with Homeopathics...

Horsing around with Homeopathics…

I did some Googling, but was not very successful – you can bet that most of the research is in French, as it is a Swiss drug, and I didn’t Google it up in Français. Anyway, I like to think I am pretty open-minded and whilst the treatment is expensive, it has no known side effects (apart from burning a small hole in your pocket). Meh…I’m willing to give it ago. Also, I wanted to write about the success (or failure) of the Serocytol therapy, you know, just in case it is the cure-all for this nasty little disease!

I started the treatment at the same time as I started my AI diet, so it was lucky enough to be credited for some good results at first. However, when I fell of my AI wagon (with a few bumps appearing shortly after), I knew that it was really my strict diet that had given me respite. Despite all that, I’m not a quitter and where would be the sense in starting a treatment, if I wasn’t to give it its best shot? So, mug or not, I am going to order a second batch.

The Homeopath has already tried me on about 8 other different homeopathic remedies and this time, he has prescribed another three on top of the Serocytols. He’s a persistent man and I thank him for that, because if I were a homeopath faced with a disease as complicated and diverse as Hidradenitis Suppurativa, I would have just thrown in the towel!

I am reimbursed by the French state for all homeopathic treatments (apart from the Serocytols), including most of the consultation fee, which is only 36 euro anyway. So, it’s off to the pharmacy I go today (for my freebie homeopathic granules and probiotics). Serocytol will have to wait until next payday, but fortunately HS is very patient and I know it’ll stick around until then. 🙂

 

The Bridget Jones of dieting and yam-yams.

8 days. 8 days of antibiotics and 8 days of eating clean. Supposedly.

I’m happy to say that I have only missed one dose of my antibiotics. Not happy because I’m intoxicating my lovely gut with these drugs and a missed dose means a health break for my insides. No, happy that with the chaos of moving out, I have managed to remember to take them so often. It helps that Mr B is on board and I get the odd gentle reminder to get my ass of the sofa at night and take them. If I’m going to trial this antibiotics thing, I’ve got to do it 100% otherwise, what is the point?

My update on the antibiotics…well, I have still got the unmentionable going on in (and then swiftly out of) my stomach, although it is only happening once a day, so it’s bearable.  I have no gouty symptoms anymore, but what I do have is overwhelming tiredness. Like the type you get when having a flare (or a hangover). Just ridiculous I’m-gonna-lie-down-right-here-on-the-tiles type tiredness. Tiredness that makes my fuse reaaaaally short. The same as when you’re horomonal. That kind of tiredness. I’m hoping it’s yet another one of those symptoms that will gradually fade away, but until then I am having to be extra kind to myself, in order to achieve anything. Otherwise my Inner Perfectionist (she lives on the opposite side to my Inner Hypochondriac) keeps getting really cross that I am not getting my chores done, efficiently or at done all in some cases. I’m ignoring her and the Hypochondriac. Let them battle it out together. I’m just too tired to listen to either of them.

A new side-effect is yam-yams. This term may not be a familiar term to you, but you’ll see it makes true, onomatopoeic sense. Have you ever had a dry mouth from surgery, or from taking medication? When you are so dehydrated , your mouth feels like the inside of Ghandi’s flip-flop, in the desert, after he’s walked a few hundred miles? Well, yam-yams is the sound your mouth makes when you try to rehydrate it without actually drinking. When you suck your tongue and open and shut your mouth. Yam, yam, yam. This is what I have. Constantly. Despite drinking a fish pond of fluids daily. Still, I won’t die (really, Inner Hypochondriac, I really won’t.)

Then there’s my diet. Hmmm. I am mostly doing good. Lots of beautiful meals, but little creativity going on. Roast chicken or pork. Roasted vegetables. Pan-fried fish. Sautéed courgettes, garlic and onions. Roasted sweet potatoes. In cubes. In wedges. In bigger chunks. Lots of smooth coconut oil, lavished all over everything I cook. Lots of raw coconut. Tinned fish. Sauerkraut. No grains, bread, pasta, sweets, processed food.  Ok, no processed foods apart from two or three. Dried apricots and wine. And a little cheese. I had one glass of beautiful, high-quality, red wine at a Wine and Cheese party Saturday night. You would think that I would have learnt my lesson after nearly dying the day before of all the side effects of my meds; instead I ignored the potential cirrhosis of the liver and sipped a lovely glass of Burgundy.

I am Bridget Jones. Of the diet world. I make poor choices, repeatedly.

To be fair, the wine didn’t cause me to flare, neither did the raw milk cheese, called Langres (delicious by the way and from a beautiful little Fromagerie, where 95% of their stock is cheese made from raw milk). Maybe this lulled me into a false sense of security.Then came the dried apricots….

Yesterday, I was baking for Ty’s school fair. My Sugar Dragon was mocking me, as it always does when I’m baking. How tough is it to wash your hands every time a bit of chocolate or cake mix touches your fingers? To put the dark chocolate-smeared spoon straight in the dishwasher, fighting every instinct to put it in your mouth?? So, I caved and had a few apricots. No big deal, I thought, I’m on killer antibiotics, so it should be all right…

WRONG! The apricots have the highest fructose content of anything in the house (apart from the dried figs – thank goodness I didn’t see those!). Fructose and anything high sugar causes me to flare. In fact there is so much fructose in those little, seemingly harmless, gooey balls of organic, dried fruit, that I would probably have been better off licking the dark chocolate off the spoon.

So, take antibiotics if you want. Or don’t, it really is an individual choice that may even change over time. However, if you are going to make one personal choice that helps you to heal, try to cut out the sugar. It does seem that sugar, along with heat and humidity, really does affect so many people’s Hidradenitis Suppurativa. It is not that easy, especially if you live with others who happen to exist in a world where school fairs demand cakes. Especially if you continue to feed your inner Sugar Dragon, instead of slaying it. But it is definitely worth it in the end.

Today’s conclusion. An autoimmune protocol diet (with no added sugar) definitely works and hopefully Bridget Jones will learn to accept this very soon.

Day 8 and the jury is still out on the antibiotics. Now, where did I put my pint of water? Yam, yam, yam……

Holiday and travel. Part deux.

I am heading back to the UK for a surprise visit for a close friend’s hen weekend. I am so excited about the holiday and seeing friends and family, but extremely apprehensive. I guess travelling alone with a 22 month old baby would be a scary enough prospect for anyone, but for me that is not the biggest issue. I have different concerns.

I will not have my own food and limited access to kitchens for the first couple of days. After a day of travelling on Tuesday, we will be staying at a friend’s house in Hassock’s for one night and will be visiting in London the following day. I won’t be at Mum’s until Wednesday evening. I’m still struggling to come to terms with the limited foods that I can eat. As I so often fall off the wagon, I feel it’s a little hypocritical of me to start demanding that people make allowances for my diet. On the other hand, I should have the right to choose when I want to fall off my wagon – shouldn’t I? Even 3 months on, I’m still not sure how to deal with my dietary changes in new situations. In any case, I’ve packed a whole loads of fruit for the trip and plan on buying bags of washed salad for my lunch on Wednesday. My lovely, accommodating friend has reassured me that my food needs are not too tricky, so Tuesday evening should be fine, too.

My other issues are a bit more icky. Dressings and washable pads. I’ll strap on some Mepilex, gauze and Micropore before I leave, and at my first loo break, I’ll just ditch them. If I don’t strap up and I have to walk for some distance, I get sore much quicker. However, with a suitcase, baby and baby-carrier, I don’t think I’ll quite manage to replace the dressings on my journey. What will I do with my washable pads (yes, I have made my own home-made sanitary pads and they are much more comfortable than the plasticky disposables)? I think I have a waterproof zip bag that I can use – but who wants to be carrying dirty pads around with them?! After weighing it up, I figure it is just another thing I should get over. I just need to be prepared when I go change the pads, and have my little bag ready.

I’m disappointed that I’m already flaring from my last holiday. I so wanted to be flare-free and hoped to indulge a little more this time. With a camping trip planned for the weekend, with camping food and cocktails, I really wanted some leeway. On the other hand, I’m also disappointed that I’m completely off track. I so wanted to be disciplined with this. I wanted to heal my leaky gut, be flare-free, head into remission and live a pain-free life. Instead I am on a different path, but one that means I am living and enjoying life. I am not ensconced in my diet and I am not monitoring every little change in my skin. I am socialising, laughing, having fun and eating fun foods. I am, for much of the time, pretending I haven’t got this disease. My flares are much worse, but I know that after these holidays, I will back to reality. HS doesn’t let you forget for long.

FODMAPS and Autoimmune Protocol eating – a dieting minefield.

I have no idea where to start with this post. Do I start with the fact I’m having a new flare, despite ‘clean’ eating? Do I say that I’m glad my mini-meltdown from yesterday is over? Do I explain that despite thinking I was ready to reintroduce old foods, I may have to eliminate new ones?? Maybe that last one is a good place to start. It was the cause of the mini meltdown anyway and I need to start thinking of solutions, not dwelling on things I have no control over.
So here it is. I think that I am reacting to FODMAPs. Many IBS sufferers will be familiar with this acronym. Straight from Wiki:

FODMAPs are short chain carbohydrates and monosaccharides which are poorly absorbed in the small intestine, including fructansgalactansfructose and polyols. The term is an acronym, deriving from “FermentableOligo-Di-Mono-saccharides and Polyols

I had a little flare after eating cabbage and then a huge flare yesterday after eating a whole globe artichoke the night before. Yummy fresh, wholesome artichoke. Now added to my ‘can’t have’ list.  Great.
On this occasion, there was nothing else that could have caused this flare other than the offending green ball. When I thought cabbage may have caused a flare,  I asked for some advice on the Facebook page The HS Diet Connection and I was told to consider FODMAPS. Now, I had heard of them before, but any elimination diet is overwhelming enough and when I started the AI protocol and looked at FODMAPs I just ignored the latter and focused on the AI diet. I was a bit overwhelmed as it was and I think that trying to cut out FODMAPs would’ve tipped me over the edge.I have been doing the AI diet since February and although it’s been hard, I don’t feel as daunted by a new regime as I did back when I started. I think I am ready to make a change. From today I will spend a ridiculous amount of time (that I’ll never get back) researching various internet resources on FODMAPs and familiarising myself with new recipes in order to fully embrace this new food lifestyle.

I did a basic search and found this beautiful table, produced by Aglaée the Paleo Dietitian, which stopped me spinning off the deep end and gave me a good place to start. Her site is stacked with info about all the variations on the Paleo diet and has been a great place for me to start with this new look at foods. The following picture is used with her permission.

There are a few things that I am confident that I am ok eating. Well cooked onions, garlic, sweet potato and sauerkraut have all been my good friends over the past few months and I think I can tolerate them fairly well. However, this might be the completely subjective view of a person in denial. We’ll see. For the purpose of staying sane and still being able to eat more than just chicken and carrots, I am reintroducing some of the old foods that are ok on the FODMAP chart. Starting with eggs.
So, today has been a new ‘Day 1’ for me. I feel a bit lost again and a bit sick of it all. Just when I thought it was safe to leave Google alone for a while, I have to start at the very beginning of a new way of eating. Life could be worse I suppose. There could be no Google at all and then I’d be moaning about that.And to get through it all, once again, I am playing the ‘glad’ game, remembering to be grateful for all the amazing stuff I have – although right now, I’d probably trade it all in for some Lindt 85% dark chocolate!

Good food, good wine, good cheese. Hangover.

Hangover Day.

I had a fabulous evening with friends last night. It was a perfect end to a not so perfect week. Last night I ate most everything I am not supposed to, and I thoroughly enjoyed it. It was a conscious choice and almost certainly swayed by the fact I was having a flare up anyway – what’s a couple more days pain once you’re in it?

I have three suspects on my flare list. Number one – gluten. Straight forward, right? You’d think so. But it was an accident. I was making pasta for the kids – they don’t always eat everything I do – and I cooked the carrots in with the pasta. When I dished up, I absent-mindedly ate a few of the carrots. Oh. There’s gluten in the water and probably soaked all the way into my otherwise innocent carrots. What an idiot. So, instead of having a lovely piece of homemade flatbread with garlic infused olive oil and parsley, the olive oil dripping down my chin, whilst I savour the moist, hot, doughy piece of heaven….I got carrots. Idiot.

Number two: Lady’s time of the month. Boo. ‘Nuff said.

Number three: Walnuts. A conscious decision to have walnuts, as I had already started to flare from either Suspect One or Suspect Two. Ed made an amazing dinner of organic chicken breast, filled with pesto, with a side of sautéed cabbage and paris mushrooms. The pesto recipe came from my Well Fed cookbook and it happened to include walnuts. It was delicious. Walnuts may not have been the culprit, but as I was on a downward spiral already, who knows?

So there we go. By last night, I had already flared up pretty bad. My decision to slowly reintroduce foods was thwarted again, by an accidental ingestion of gluten, damn hormones and well, a slippery slope from there. So, last night we had this:

An appetiser of julienne cut raw carrots and radishes, with a creme fraiche and chive dip (I didn’t have dip). Then I made the aforementioned flatbread, dripping with roasted garlic infused olive oil and parsley, cooked on a pizza stone ( I had a bit of this – first time I’ve had flour in three months).

For main we had marinated a huge rump steak in olive oil, salt and pepper in the morning and left it all day. The same with two duck breasts, skin on. We also had pork strips, just ‘nature’. Just an hour or so before dinner, we squeezed the juice of a Sanguinello orange (blood orange) into the duck marinade.

These were cooked on our BBQ and seared with a salad of rocket, iceberg lettuce, thinly sliced fennel, sliced radish and diced cucumber, with a Sanguinello, lemon and oil dressing. The combination of all the meats and the salad, especially with the citrus dressing was amazing! I probably enjoyed this food the most, despite the other food indulgences. There’s nothing quite like grilled meat with an amazing salad.

My other downfall. Wine and pudding. Ty had made an amazing apple crumble and once I started tucking into this, I helped myself to quite a bit! It was probably nothing compared to the portions I would have had before, but I guess there is no such thing as a ‘good’ sized portion of flour, butter and sugar! We drank 3 bottles of quality red wine and finished off with some organic Brie and Tommes cheese. Heaven.

I woke up at 4.30 am in a bit of stomach distress and with a headache. I had one (usually prohibited) ibuprofen, lots of water and went back to bed.

So, here it is. Hangover Day. But this morning I feel good. I had a great night. I didn’t beat myself up about what I ate and today all I am craving is salad. I am not in hideous pain (yet!) I hope I stay on course and that my flares go as quickly as they came. Roll on beautiful Sunday!